Cloud Computing Expected to Save Billions in Taxpayer Dollars


With the election just around the corner, the American people’s attention has honed in on both the candidates and the state of the federal government’s financial situation. Headlines detailing excessive spending and abuse of taxpayer money have been fairly consistent over the past several years and, combined with the rather staggering amount of U.S. debt, has led to a public demand for more responsible spend management and a reduction in spending without loss of quality or access to vital services. It’s challenging for any single idea to make a drastic impact on the U.S. financial situation (especially with a deficit that has that many zeros tagged on at the end), but the results of a recent survey show that the federal government’s cloud computing initiative is expected to bring a large amount of savings – to the tune of billions of dollars.

NextGov reported the survey results, which were that federal managers believe transitioning more critical technology and government services to cloud computing will save an estimated $16.6 billion each year. That figure is more than three times the initial estimate from the Office of Management and Budget, which has been spearheading the plan to move more government agencies into the cloud. Chief Information Officer Vivek Kundra recently informed a Senate panel that transitioning to cloud-based computer storage and services alone would save approximately $5 billion.

The rise in SaaS options and the growth of cloud computing overall has literally changed the way many companies do business, offer services, make money and reduce costs. It’s well past time for the government to step up and make use of this technology, especially when the results are expected to lead to billions in savings, a substantial environmental impact and more convenient, user-friendly government services.

The article went on to report that 91% of federal managers who have moved at least one service to the cloud claimed it was a successful endeavor, but less than 60% of respondents worked for agencies that had attempted to move an application to the cloud.

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